St. Johns River to Sea Loop (Halifax Trail)

Proposed Route for Proposed SJR2C Loop Trail (Halifax Trail Segment)

The St. Johns River to Sea (SJR2C) Loop Project Development & Environment (PD&E) Study is being conducted by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) to develop and evaluate options for a multi-use trail from South Daytona to Edgewater. The purpose of the PD&E Study is to close the existing trail gap in accordance with Shared-Use Non-motorized (SUN) Trail standards. Once complete, the trail would connect the cities of Edgewater, New Smyrna Beach, South Daytona, Port Orange, Daytona Beach and parts of unincorporated Volusia County.

The proposed 8’ to 12’ wide trail route within Port Orange is shown in blue and purple on the map above. The trail is anticipated to use the existing sidewalk in the McDonald Road and Charles Street rights-of way to connect to Riverwalk Park, and then south in the Halifax Drive/Riverside Drive right-of-way and then connecting with Ridgewood Avenue through an unimproved right-of-way and then south toward New Smyrna Beach along US 1. 

Click here for information and contact for the Project Development & Environment (PD&E) Study being conducted by FDOT. 

Below are citizen questions submitted to the City of Port Orange Community Development Department as of January 10, 2019.

Who proposed the trail loop project?
The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Shared Use Non-Motorized (SUN) Trail Program proposed the trail loop project. The SUN Trail program provides funding for the development of a statewide system of paved multi-use trails for bicyclists and pedestrians, physically separated from the road.
What is the project timeline over the next 5, 10, and 15 years?
The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) is conducting a Project Development and Environment (PD&E) Study for the St. Johns River to Sea (SJR2C) Loop to evaluate several alternatives to improve bicycle and pedestrian accommodations by implementing a trail. The study is located within the cities of South Daytona, Port Orange, and New Smyrna Beach. If improvements are recommended and accepted by the FDOT District Five Secretary, the proposed trail project will proceed into future project phases based on available funding. As of February 2019, the design phase and construction phase are unfunded.
Are there any plans for crossing Dunlawton Ave at Aunt Catfish, going north or south?
Improvements for crossing Dunlawton Avenue at Halifax Drive are being evaluated as part of the Project Development and Environment (PD&E) Study. Possible improvements to the intersection include traffic control devices (signs, signals, markings, and other devices used to regulate, warn, or guide traffic) and/or a pedestrian bridge over Dunlawton Avenue. As of February 2019, a specific improvement has not been selected.
Who will maintain the trail? How frequently? Who will be picking up trash/litter along trail?
Similar to other trails and sidewalks in Port Orange, the City will maintain the surface of the trail or sidewalk, maintain signage, and pick-up litter or trash from the public right-of-way.
The City is already facing expenditures they don’t have funds for. What percentage of funding for this project is coming from Port Orange?
The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) SUN Trail program provides funding for the Project Development and Environment (PD&E) Study phase, design phase, and construction phase. When the trail is completed, the City of Port Orange will be responsible for trail operation and maintenance.
Where will people park? How will parking be controlled?
The City is currently evaluating the development of City-owned vacant lots on Ridgewood Avenue for public parking lots.

There will be no change in the City's Ordinances as it relates to parking in public streets.

The St. Johns River to Sea (SJR2C) Loop Trail will connect to the City’s existing sidewalk and trail network, allowing people to access the SJR2C trail via bicycle or walking.

Halifax/Riverside is a “scenic roadway” that is home to a wonderful collection of wildlife that will also be adversely affected. Has EPA been consulted?
A Project Development and Environment (PD&E) Study is conducted to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). As part of the PD&E Study, potential environmental impacts (wetlands, water quality, animal habitat) to be addressed during design phase are identified.
Will there be any porta-potties, benches, or garbage cans along the trail?
The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) will not fund these improvements as part of the trail project. At this stage of the project, the City does not have plans to install porta-potties, benches or trash cans along the trail. These features will be discussed during the design phase of the project.
Will the one-way road at Meeker Pl be changed to eastbound? This would allow residents to enjoy driving on Halifax/Riverside at an earlier point.
Meeker Place will remain as a one-way road. The vehicle travel direction of Meeker Place is being evaluated as part of the Project Development and Environment (PD&E) Study.

The vehicle travel direction for Halifax Drive/Riverside Drive between Dunlawton Avenue and Niver Street is also being evaluated as part of the Project Development and Environment (PD&E) Study.
Will the city help clean up debris on the trail? (from storms, high tide, etc.)
The City of Port Orange will be responsible for maintaining the trail which includes storm debris on the trail.
Will the property owner's land be taken?
The trail will be constructed within the public rights-of-way and will not encroach on property owner's land.
The 5ft median and 8-10ft “path” will more than encroach on the resident’s riparian rights.
The trail will be constructed within the public rights-of-way and will not encroach on property owner's riparian rights.
Will any of the side streets, like the one on Carlton, be closed?
No public rights-of-way will be closed to vehicular and pedestrian traffic as part of the SJR2C trail loop project. A segment of Halifax Drive/Riverside Drive is proposed to be one-way to allow the trail to be built within the existing public right-of-way.
Will curbing be installed along the length of the trail?
Will there be a barrier between the proposed one-way street and the trail?
Based on the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT)trail details provided in November 2018, no raised curbing or barriers are proposed at this time for the trail segments in public rights-or-way within Port Orange.
One-way road with median will eliminate resident’s ability to remove or place water craft at their docks.
Based on the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) trail details provided in November 2018, no raised curbing or barriers are proposed at this time for the trail segments in public rights-of-way within Port Orange.

Therefore, residents who live along Halifax Drive/Riverside Drive will still be able to cross the public right-of-way to remove or place water crafts at their dock.
Does City right-of-way at the end of each side street has the potential of becoming a make shift park?
The areas at the end of the side streets, perpendicular to Halifax Drive/Riverside Drive that abut the Halifax River, are currently part of the public rights-of-way and are open to the public.

There are no plans to improve these portions of the public rights-of-way as designated parks.
Will it become illegal for [property owners] to ride their mowers across the path to maintain their lawn?
No.
Would residents can run electrical power under the roadway to provide security lighting for their docks?
A homeowner can request a License Agreement to install electric lines under a public right-of-way. A License Agreement requires approval by the City Council. A License Agreement is required when constructing improvements in a City public right-of-way.
Will there be additional pavement as a result of the trail construction?
The impervious area (asphalt or concrete) for the trail segment located within the Halifax Drive/Riverside Drive right-of-way, between Dunlawton Avenue and Niver Street, is not anticipated to increase. Based on the FDOT trail detail provided in November 2018, 5-ft of existing roadway is proposed to be removed to create a grass median between the road and trail. The impervious area added for the trail will be equal to the impervious area removed to create the grass median. Detailed drainage analysis will be done during the design phase, not as part of the PD&E study.

In sections where segments of the trail are to be built, new impervious area (asphalt or concrete) will be added along with stormwater improvements to handle the stormwater created by the impervious area added.  

Click here to a view rendering of trail detail in Halifax Drive.
How will traffic get around maintenance trucks (buses, lawn care, garbage, etc.) on the one-way street?
Vehicles such as, lawn care, contractor, service, and delivery can park in the grass parkage of the public right-of-way, located west of the roadway and outside of the travel lane. There may be a time when a vehicle is behind a garbage truck traveling on the one-way segment of Halifax Drive/Riverside Drive until the time the driver reaches their destination or makes a turn onto one of the perpendicular side streets that connect to Ridgewood Avenue.
Will the city cover us for injuries or accidents that occur on trial?
The City will address injuries and accidents on the trail in the same manner as injuries and accidents that occur on other public trails and sidewalks in the City's rights-of-way.
Will Meeker Place become a two-way road?
Meeker Place will remain as a one-way street.

We appreciate and welcome all questions, concerns or feedback concerning the proposed Halifax Trail. 

Feel free to contact Community Development at (386) 506-5601 or email [email protected]


Important Dates and Deadlines:

Coming soon!